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Home / The Life and Inventions of Thomas Edison

The Life and Inventions of Thomas Edison


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In the history of the United States, there have been a number of brilliant inventors such as Samuel Morse, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Graham Bell and others who have come up with inventions that have helped change our world. However, one of the countries most prolific inventors was Thomas A. Edison. Throughout his career he has been credited with in excess of 1,000 patents in his name. These patents and inventions range from the wireless telegraph to the phonograph to the motion picture camera to the electric lamp. Through all of the inventions of Edison, he has had a hand in many of the luxuries and necessities that we enjoy today.

Thomas Edison was born on February 11, 1847 in a small community in Ohio. At a young age, Edison was intrigued by a number of subjects and was constantly in search of answers to his questions. The quest for information led the young Edison to read any and all books on a variety of subjects. As a teen, Thomas Edison began working in a Western Union Office in Boston where he began becoming interested in the technology of the day, and started to think of ways to improve the process.





After his stay in Boston, Edison moved to New York City. It was there that some of his most important inventions were created. While he was unsuccessful in beating Alexander Graham Bell to the telephone, he developed a number of inventions including the stock ticker and light bulb. From the light bulb, he came up with the very first system of distributing light and power. And, one of the most important developments was the implementation of the first research facility, which Edison created in New Jersey.

It was in the new research facility in West Orange, New Jersey that Thomas Edison became one of the most prolific inventors of all time. Here is when he invented the motion picture, the electric motor, dictating machine and disc records for the phonograph. In the early 1900's' Thomas Edison was asked by the United States government to assist with the military efforts. From the work of Edison he developed technology that was used for sonar and radar, and other uses by the military.

Edison passed away on October 18, 1931 at the age of 84. Right up until his death Thomas Edison was active in creating patents and ideas that have been used throughout the years. At the age of 83, Edison was credited with his 1,093rd and final patent. 

With all of the inventions that have been credited to Thomas Alva Edison, he is considered to be the greatest inventor in the history of the United States. To learn more about Edison and his inventions, here are some useful information.